buying into vintage on MTGO



  • I was wanting to buy into vintage on MTGO and im not sure where to start, I know I need to buy power, but past that im not sure. i want to eventually get to the point where i can build most major decks and maybe have to spend 50 dollars to finish it, are there any suggestions to do this? where should i buy the cards at, any sites that sell them for cheap, things like that. any suggestions would be appreciated, thank you in advance.



  • It's probably about 2 grand for what you want. You can make a big order like that through mtgotrader or you can bargain hunt through MTGO wiki price. Personally I think the best approach is to just buy one deck and then add a hundred or two every week until you have all that you want.

    http://www.mtgotraders.com/store/index.html

    https://www.mtgowikiprice.com



  • @letseeker because of the way MTGO works, the prices are pretty homogenized. If you hunt for the absolute best deals you might save about 4-5%, but you'll spend hours doing it. I recommend buying the tickets from store and using the goatbots chain to save a few dollars, but by far the easiest is to buy the cards on MTGOTraders.com.

    As for cost, expect to pay well over $1,000 to build a collection big enough to play several decks. Mtggoldfish.com has a great database of decks and the expected costs of each one.

    Good luck!



  • The MTGO wiki price is a new thing that I discovered from my pal @Islandswamp

    Some cards can be hard to find from general chain bots. Like For example, Nemesis Tangle Wire is $50 but the promo Tangle Wire is only $10. Because of that price difference, the promo Tangle Wires are hard to find. MTGO wiki prices tells you exactly who has them for the cheapest price.

    I'll also add that once you purchase a card, it can be difficult to get the exact value back that you paid for it. I would expect to only get 80% value back each time you make a transaction. For example, I have a tendency to try really "out there" decks, so I might spend $50 on a set of Stifles and then come to the realization that Stifle is a terrible card. So I'll try to sell the Stifles for something else I want to try. I'll probably only get $40 back for the Stifles and so then I buy a set of Goblin Welders for $40. If I decide that Goblin Welder is terrible, I'll probably only get about $32 back for them. Just something to be aware of.


  • TMD Supporter

    @desolutionist said:

    The MTGO wiki price is a new thing that I discovered from my pal @Islandswamp

    Some cards can be hard to find from general chain bots. Like For example, Nemesis Tangle Wire is $50 but the promo Tangle Wire is only $10. Because of that price difference, the promo Tangle Wires are hard to find. MTGO wiki prices tells you exactly who has them for the cheapest price.

    I'll also add that once you purchase a card, it can be difficult to get the exact value back that you paid for it. I would expect to only get 80% value back each time you make a transaction. For example, I have a tendency to try really "out there" decks, so I might spend $50 on a set of Stifles and then come to the realization that Stifle is a terrible card. So I'll try to sell the Stifles for something else I want to try. I'll probably only get $40 back for the Stifles and so then I buy a set of Goblin Welders for $40. If I decide that Goblin Welder is terrible, I'll probably only get about $32 back for them. Just something to be aware of.

    @desolutionist has given you some sage advice here, pay close attention. I've switched decks many. many times, and had to buy and sell cards to do so. You don't lose as much value as you would in paper (using buylists and such) but you DO lose some, so just be careful. Also, I have an article series that might be helpful. In the first two articles I did for MTGGoldfish I suggested some ways to mitigate costs when buying in to mtgo. And if you want your black lotus to have Chris Rush art, I know a guy who can make that happen.



  • Beyond immediately buying cards for one deck to get you started (which you should do of course), a way to save on price in the long run, if you're not in a super hurry to build your entire vintage collection, is to look for the ebb and flows of card prices. If there are standard legal cards being played in vintage (case in point: jace, vryn's prodigy) don't buy it when it costs 90 tix (as it did last winter), wait until rotation gets near and buy then (price now: 10-20 tix depending on supply). The other ebbs and flows are trickier to predict but reading and following vintage content helps you identify potential bargains (i.e. cards which might suddenly start seeing a lot of play but are still cheap, for instance, engineered explosives is now 50-ish tix but was around 10 tix for a long time). Look for cards in upcoming sets which have been deemed as vintage worthy and buy thos eimmediately after the set releases (they will be cheap if not popular also in standard) Another way to save is to buy cards when the major archetype they are played in is not so popular since that increases the likelihood of prices being low. Misty rainforest, for instance, is clearly lower in price now since Oath decsk aren't highlighted as much currently. Also, use the price history graphs on e.g. MTGgoldfish to see if a card's current price is historically low (meaning you should buy it now) or high (meaning it is probably smart to wait until prices normalize). There are also some micro-management tricks such as selling cards you need when their prices peak and buy back later when prices are lower or sell normal version and buy foil instead since foils are usually cheaper for MTGO .


  • Administrators

    If I were buying into MTGO right now, I would use the site www.mtgotraders.com, and use the promo code DARKESTPAYPAL (you can only use that if you're buying with a credit card/paypal, which I'm assuming is the case if you don't already have an MTGO collection). You can save a few tickets shopping around, but honestly I'm not sure it's worth the convenience of getting everything you need all at once. If you want to shop around, Goatbots.com often has decent prices on the pricier cards.

    If you're working towards a large collection, I'd start with one broad archetype, probably "Ancient Tomb.dec" (Shops, Eldrazi), Gush (Jeskai Mentor, Grixis Pyromancer), or Big Blue (Tezzeret, Grixis Control, you can include Storm here if you want) ... Any of those broad archetypes are going to share a lot of the pricier cards between them, and let you transition between a few decks cheaply.

    The most expensive individual investments you might want to make are:
    (these are very rough numbers, rounded to nearest $50, and fluctuate)

    All the artifact mana - $250
    Blue Power - $50
    typical mix of blue fetches/duals for one deck - $150

    4 Tangle Wire OR 4 Show and Tell OR 4 Cavern of Souls $200
    4 Wastelands - $150
    4 Force of Will OR Doomsday OR 4 Containment Priest $100
    2 Griselbrand OR 4 Mentor $50

    Oath decks are disproportionately expensive online, Shops and Storm decks are disproportionately cheaper. Dredge is the cheapest deck you can get, but the cards aren't useful in anything else.



  • @Brass-Man good call on the mtgotraders discount code. I forgot all about that!


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